Various Predictions for 2009

These are the predictions I've seen in media/technology so far.  Anyone have any others?

From @themediaisdying tweet on Twitter:

YOUR PREDICTIONS: EW, OK!, SEATTLE TIMES, MIAMI HERALD, BLENDER, EWEEK and COMPUTERWORLD will all not se e Christmas 2009.

From cnet.com:

  • Sony:  Further reduction in PS3 pricing, Blu-Ray struggles to gain ground on DVDs with streaming taking off
  • Apple:  Ends iPhone exclusivity with AT&T (on the heels of the Wal-Mart introduction) and Jobs announces his planned retirement.
  • Microsoft:  Windows 7 rushed out the door hits store shelves

From NetworkWorld:

  • IT spending to be cut 10-20%
  • Unemployed IT professionals will help boost growth in cybercrime.
  • Company's social networking initiatives lose stream as they get considered speculative/frivolous.
  • Google to acquire Salesforce.com
  • Wireless propagation slows down wired switch sales.
  • Video finally takes off as a communications medium.
  • Social engineering will proliferate and "Scareware" will boom.

I'll be curious to see how much of this is valid even halfway through the year (if even quantifiable).

Added:

Added 1/1/2009:

Added 1/6/2009:

Added 1/12/2009:

Have a new computer user in the family?

Just caught a new post on Digital Inspiration, one of my favorite practical technology blogs:

The Essential Guide to Internet & Software for First-Time Computer Users

The first few mentions are easy:  PC Decrapifier, Firefox with Delicious add-on, Google Docs, but this article has some gems that I still have yet to use myself:

  • Iterasi - archives your favorite web pages (whether static or dynamic), allowing them to be retrieved from other locations and shared via e-mail.
  • Eyejot - send video e-mail
  • Evernote - turn paper documents into digital docs that are more easily found and managed.

I'd recommend reading the full article, even if you're tech-savvy.  You might find a few gems yourself.

MediaWiki on xampp

Okay, I installed  JSPWiki on xampp on an SD card to have an isolated sandbox for JSPWiki.  The install was space intensive due to the number of small files added with Tomcat and JSPWiki.  The install was also not entirely portable, in that the only systems that could run the setup from the SD card were those that had J2EE 5.x or later installed--quite the high end requirement.

So I decided to install MediaWiki instead.

  • Download the ZIP package from from the xampp for windows
  • Open the xampp-win32-*.*.*.zip file that was just downloaded and extract to C: (change to flash drive drive letter here if necessary).
  • Run [drive]:xamppxampp_start.exe to test starting up the web server and mysql.  Validate that browsing to your local machine brings up a served web page.  Depending on the speed of the media you're using this may take 15 seconds or so after running xampp_start.exe

At this point, xampp should be ready to for installing MediaWiki.  (Shorter walkthrough here.)

  • Download the latest version from the MediaWiki download page. (version 1.13.3 as of this writing)
  • Use 7-zip to unpack the tar/gz file.
    • Right-click the media-wiki-1.13.3.tar.gz file and click 7-zip -> Open Archive
    • Single-click on the media-wiki-1.13.3.tar file and click the [Extract] button in the menubar.
    • You should have a media-wiki-1.13.3 folder in the same location as the zip file you downloaded.  Rename this to MediaWiki.
  • Copy the MediaWiki folder to [drive]:xampphtdocs.  (Note:  You could also copy the contents of the folder to the htdocs directly, but then you would need to delete the index.* files and would also lose your links to phpMyAdmin, etc..)
  • Browse to http://localhost/MediaWiki
  • Click on the setup link on the page.
  • Fill in
    • Wiki name
    • Admin username and password/password confirm
    • Probably want to disable e-mail options for this setup
    • Fill in a new database name, db username, and db password (this should be created for you because of the security setup with xampp)
    • Check "Use superuser account" (this will enable username/password and database creation)
    • Database table name prefix (I used the suggested "mw_")
    • Click [Install MediaWiki]
  • Move the config/LocalSettings.php file to the parent directory ([drive]:xampphtdocsMediaWiki), then follow this link to your wiki.

Some clean-up:

You may want to go to http://localhost/phpmyadmin/ click on Privileges and Edit both of the MySQL root accounts to have passwords.  There is a separate [Go] button under the "Change Password" section of the "Edit Privileges" page for this.

Media Wiki Successful Installation

For my default installation of xampp with MediaWiki on a 2 GB drive:

  • 6,827 files and 664 folders
  • Size: 294 MB (309,291,225 bytes)
  • Size on Disk: 311 MB (326,238,208 bytes)

Still quite a bit of space, but more efficient than the JSPWiki install on a FAT32 partition.

DM Fail

Found this from the @mashable blog link: Twitter DMs That Went Public: DM Fail.

Someone creating a "service" to feed off of misunderstanding of how Twitter syntax works to try to pick out some incriminating tidbits that people didn't intend as a public post. My thought is that if they are incriminating, they are much more so in context of the friend list who has already seen the accidentally public tweet. This search also misses out on the much easier accidental public tweeting via SMS--when you reply to a direct message, but forget the 'd ' at the front. Especially when you also have the Twitter Facebook app on.

The Next Windows ME?

A co-worker the other day suggested to me that Windows 7 was going to be the next Windows ME, because of the rush to market that seems to be going on.   I would tend to believe the opposite; that Windows Vista is becoming the next Windows ME.  However, I'm starting to become mildly skeptical of the negative press around Vista (at a time when critical mass seemed to be approaching.)

Microsoft, and thereby Vista, is a victim of its own success.  Microsoft's success can be attributed to having the most accessible (in terms of purchasing and running) operating system in the PC market.  Mac and Linux have passionate followings that often adopt a "common good" philosophy when it comes to necessary changes, each having their own class of power users who pull the user communities forward.  Mac OS made virtually a clean break with OS X (with some legacy support), but Apple wasn't selling downgrade licenses to OS 9.  Nor is Apple in the business of supporting legacy hardware indefinitely.

Windows?  Windows is what you get if you buy a retail PC.  Windows is the Yahoo search engine in alternate universe where Google charges per search.  Windows just (sort of) works, and mostly plays ball with virtually any device manufacturer.  This breed of openness through ubiquity and anarchy creates the situation where there isn't really any accountability for lack of support, yet it's somehow expected just the same.

All user environments offer their own quirks, and many proprietary and open source applications are offered to help mitigate those quirks.  There's is, however, one non-quirk that I would change about Windows from a user perspective:  there should be only one kernel/core dll that invokes a reboot when updated, and Windows itself should be the only thing allowed to update it.  Any other changes are just fluff and a reasonably competent and/or determined user should be able to make the most of the user experience.

Some articles from the Windows XP/Vista/7 vault:

Microsoft Extends XP's stay - "Large PC Manufacturers were slated to have to stop selling Windows XP after January 31st [2008]"

Microsoft extends XP life... again

Windows XP Extensions Reflect Vista's Woes

Microsoft's Ballmer Touts Vista-To-XP Downgrade Program

Windows 7, Vista SP2 Hit Milestones

10 miles in 24°F / 12°F Windchill #twit2fit

10.05 miles in 1:29:04 for 8'52" pace, with one lap right at 9'00"--not too bad.

Wind really picked up towards the end of the run.

Wore long sleeve Under Armour Cold Gear shirt, Under Armour compression shorts, Under Armour Cold Gear gloves, Fitness Gear (Dick's Sporting Goods) nylon pants, OBX Marathon cap, and St. Jude ear warmers.  Can't feel my face, and I could've used a pair of cotton gloves at the beginning.

Made a space for my "tech notes"

I'm moving my tech stuff to tech0x20.com (Tech Space)

I originally created three sites on my thomaspowell.com domain:

linux-notes - I started my blogging experiment here.
vim - My "adventures" in vim, not a very broad audience, but I liked keeping public notes on my favorite programming editor here.
developernotes - I realized that I was researching and wanting to publicly note things that did not apply to the other two blogs.

Moreover, my role and experience has changed in general. I'm no longer a full-time developer. I haven't been that for a year or more. I still research programming and system configuration, but I just as often research technology, trends, and concepts. I had been using the "developer notes" blog for this, but I was starting to branch out into a new blog when it hit me. I *really* needed to kick the blogger habit. Therefore, I have started a new home with a shiny wordpress theme at tech0x20.com.

Installing JSPWiki on an XAMPP for Windows install

I've been experimenting with XAMPP as a way to setup a temporary and transportable Apache install with PHP, MySQL, and a database admin tool (phpMyAdmin). Before starting, be sure to have Sun J2EE 5.x SDK (or higher) installed.

As mentioned on PortableApps.com, by following the "Installation" without the installer instructions, XAMPP will run from a removable drive (I'm using an SD card, myself--quite a bit slower than other options, but VERY cheap).

First, I downloaded the ZIP package from from the xampp for windows page:

Open the xampp-win32-*.*.*.zip file that was just downloaded and extract to C: (change to flash drive drive letter here if necessary).

Run [drive]:xamppxampp_start.exe to test starting up the web server and mysql.
Run [drive]:xamppxampp_stop.exe to shut the web server and mysql down again.

Next download the Apache Tomcat plug-in from the XAMPP for Windows Add-Ons area.

Extract this .zip file into to the c:xampp folder (again, substitute c: for appropriate drive letter if necessary). You should get a "Confile File Overwrite" prompt when you do this--the Tomcat files should overwrite the original xampp files, so select [Yes to All].

After the Tomcat files have been extracted, run [drive]:xamppsetup_xampp.bat to setup Tomcat.

Test the installation by running

  • [drive]:xamppxampp_start.exe to start xampp, then
  • [drive]:xampptomcat_start.bat to start Tomcat.
  • Browse to http://localhost:8080, which should be something like the following:

Finally download JSPWiki (Current stable release):

Extract the JSPWiki.war file from the JSPWiki download and copy to the [drive]:xampptomcatwebapps folder.

Run [drive]:xampptomcat_stop.bat and then [drive]:xampptomcat_start.bat to restart Tomcat. Web application JSPWiki should get loaded as part of the restart. I had to restart a second time (probably started too soon after shutting down.)

Browse to http://localhost:8080/JSPWiki to view the JSPWiki page. You will be prompted to begin installation:

For the installation options, I used:

  • Application name - JSPWiki
  • BaseURL - http://localhost:8080/JSPWiki/
  • Page Storage - /p/web/www-data/jspwiki/ (default) -- note that this will be the path off of your root drive wherever xampp and Tomcat are running from. This is where the wiki pages will be stored.
  • All other options - default values

Finally:

  • Press [Configure!]
  • [drive]:xampptomcat_stop.bat to stop Tomcat.
  • [drive]:xampptomcat_start.bat to start Tomcat.
  • Browse to http://localhost:8080/JSPWiki/ to start using your JSPWiki. By default, versioning is turned on, which is accomplished by storing every version of the file in an "OLD" folder just off the main page storage folder.

Troubleshooting JSPWiki Installation

Update 2008.12.26:

One of the downsides of installing JSPWiki on xampp on a flash drive or SD card is that these drives are typically formatted with FAT32.

For the default installation of xampp with the Apache Tomcat plugin and JSPWiki on a 2 GB drive:

  • 6,499 files and 853 folders
  • Size:  281 MB (295,406,845 bytes)
  • Size on Disk:  436 MB (457,834,496 bytes)

The additional size on disk is due to the 65,536 allocation unit limit on FAT32, which means the smallest amount of space that a file can take up on a 2 GB partition is 32K.

Since JSPWiki stores each page and each version of a page in a separate file, even a relatively small wiki would take up more space.

Installing JSPWiki on an XAMPP for Windows install

I've been experimenting with XAMPP as a way to setup a temporary and transportable Apache install with PHP, MySQL, and a database admin tool (phpMyAdmin). Before starting, be sure to have Sun J2EE 5.x SDK (or higher) installed.

As mentioned on PortableApps.com, by following the "Installation" without the installer instructions, XAMPP will run from a removable drive (I'm using an SD card, myself--quite a bit slower than other options, but VERY cheap).

First, I downloaded the ZIP package from from the xampp for windows page:

Open the xampp-win32-*.*.*.zip file that was just downloaded and extract to C: (change to flash drive drive letter here if necessary).

Run [drive]:xamppxampp_start.exe to test starting up the web server and mysql.
Run [drive]:xamppxampp_stop.exe to shut the web server and mysql down again.

Next download the Apache Tomcat plug-in from the XAMPP for Windows Add-Ons area.

Extract this .zip file into to the c:xampp folder (again, substitute c: for appropriate drive letter if necessary). You should get a "Confile File Overwrite" prompt when you do this--the Tomcat files should overwrite the original xampp files, so select [Yes to All].

After the Tomcat files have been extracted, run [drive]:xamppsetup_xampp.bat to setup Tomcat.

Test the installation by running

  • [drive]:xamppxampp_start.exe to start xampp, then
  • [drive]:xampptomcat_start.bat to start Tomcat.
  • Browse to http://localhost:8080, which should be something like the following:

Finally download JSPWiki (Current stable release):

Extract the JSPWiki.war file from the JSPWiki download and copy to the [drive]:xampptomcatwebapps folder.

Run [drive]:xampptomcat_stop.bat and then [drive]:xampptomcat_start.bat to restart Tomcat. Web application JSPWiki should get loaded as part of the restart. I had to restart a second time (probably started too soon after shutting down.)

Browse to http://localhost:8080/JSPWiki to view the JSPWiki page. You will be prompted to begin installation:

For the installation options, I used:

  • Application name - JSPWiki
  • BaseURL - http://localhost:8080/JSPWiki/
  • Page Storage - /p/web/www-data/jspwiki/ (default) -- note that this will be the path off of your root drive wherever xampp and Tomcat are running from. This is where the wiki pages will be stored.
  • All other options - default values

Finally:

  • Press [Configure!]
  • [drive]:xampptomcat_stop.bat to stop Tomcat.
  • [drive]:xampptomcat_start.bat to start Tomcat.
  • Browse to http://localhost:8080/JSPWiki/ to start using your JSPWiki. By default, versioning is turned on, which is accomplished by storing every version of the file in an "OLD" folder just off the main page storage folder.

Troubleshooting JSPWiki Installation

McMillan Speed Workouts based on 21:41 5k

From McMillan Running Calculator:

Speed Workouts
Long Distance Runners
400m 1:35.2 to 1:40.7 - 9.44 mph to 8.93 mph
800m 3:18.9 to 3:28.2 - 9.04 mph to 8.64 mph
1200m 5:05.8 to 5:21.3 - 8.64 mph to 8.33 mph
1600m 6:56.4 to 7:11.7 - 8.64 mph to 8.33 mph

I'm going to be working with intervals at the 400/800/1200/1600m distances, just to motivate me to do something different.