The Theory of Poker by David Sklansky

Probably the first poker book that I've picked up that was not published through Cardoza publishing.

UML: A Beginner's Guide

Fresh out of a class that covered use cases as part of its syllabus, I read this book for a deeper understanding. I found inconsistencies between the Use Case diagrams that I studied and those in this book. Read the other review on Amazon's website for more--I found that I wasn't alone in my confusion.

Caro's Book of Poker Tells

Formerly known as Caro's Book of Tells, this is a Cardoza Publishing print of the original book. Stage-by-stage photos for the tells and profitability/accuracy of reading tells are included for each tell. Photos are from the original book (1970's?), but the descriptions and "Caro's Laws of Tells" are very useful. Over 300 pages, but at least 50% of the content contains photos or MCU Poker Charts.

Caro's Fundamental Secrets of Winning Poker

I borrowed this book from the library, both because it happened to show up in a catalog search, and because I recognized him from Poker Superstars II. Format is the Who Moved My Cheese? of poker. I see it as a motivational quick-read vs. providing detailed stategy: about 10 pages for each game, large print, with 1/3 page blackboards summarizing main points. The book is short enough that there's no risk in picking it up and reading it: at 150 large print pages, it's a quick read.

The Mythical Man-Month

The classic software engineering essay collection turns 20 years old. Interesting perspectives from 1975, 1986, and 1995. "Four new chapters" Chapter 18 is a re-examination of the original 1975 essays. Some minor clarifications are brought to light by time, but most assertions still prove completely true.

remotesplit for cscope revisited

I've decided to go with a remote tactic that's slightly more reliable than my previous tactic: Name the gvim server by the contents of the $DISPLAY variable. I have side-by-side PCs with their own X-servers, so I want to send the file to the gvim server that is outputting the same place as my cscope session. I now grep the $DISPLAY out of the gvim server list, to determing whether I am going to set up a new server or use an existing one.

My remotesplit:

gvim --serverlist | grep -i "$DISPLAY" 2>/dev/null
if [ $? -ne 0 ]
then
   gvim --servername $DISPLAY $*
else
   gvim --remote-send "<ESC>:sp $CSCOPE_ROOT/$2<CR>:0<CR>:$1<CR>:-1<CR>" 2>/dev/null
fi

More than Enough.

After making it through More Than Enough, I finally understand the structure. If you do read this book, don't cheat yourself by skipping the cumulative review sessions at the end of each chapter. They help reinforce a mindset that is a key to getting your priorities in order.

remotesplit for cscope

On a multiuser environment, I added the 'ps -fu' bit to detect a gvim session, slightly more fool-resistant than just checking the result code of the --remote-send call.

My remotesplit:

ps -fu $LOGNAME | grep -v grep | grep gvim 2>/dev/null
if [ $? -ne 0 ]
then
   gvim $*
else
   gvim --remote-send "<ESC>:sp $CSCOPE_ROOT/$2<CR>:0<CR>:$1<CR>:-1<CR>" 2>/dev/null
fi

More Dave Ramsey, Ancient History, and Texas Hold 'Em

Another Dave Ramsey Book, More Than Enough. If you need more inspiration to get your priorities straight, this is it:

I got the following book after listening to The Teaching Company's lecture series on Ancient Greece and Byzantium. I think I bought it through the History Book Club. You have to be an ancient history and classical literature fan to really get into this book, but it's interesting how it draws parallels between modern history and ancient history and the use of biological and chemical weapons.

With all the Texas Hold 'em craze, I bought the following book, Ken Warren Teaches Texas Hold 'em. It's valuable, but I think that I might go for the original Doyle Brunson book next time.

Total Money Makeover

Whether you've gotten yourself into a financial hole, or you're just starting out in life, this book should definitely be a first stop. It's an easy read, so even if you don't have a good reading attention span, you shouldn't have any trouble making it through this book. If you live paycheck-to-paycheck, you need this book.