Cancel your runners magazine subscription #twit2fit

No, I don't mean that, do I? Ok, then, as long as you just read it for the pictures, it's okay to keep it.

Actually, I have nothing against the popular running hobbyist magazines. However, you must realize what a magazine is. Magazines have several new messages every issue. Otherwise, why would you need the next issue?

While some may even take issue with some of the advice presented in the articles, I think there's a greater danger: lack of consistency. Just like you can't chase every mutual fund that a money magazine recommends, or go with the diet that you've obeyed the best that day, you can't change training plans on a weekly or monthly basis.

Yet, that is just what will happen if you take the articles to heart: you'll switch plans. You'll switch because the first thing that will happen is the doubt that you can pull this off, that this plan is right for you. It happens on term papers, on novels, on investments, and certainly on a 16 week training plan. To compound the psychological effects, your body will be giving you feedback through all of the tough workouts, through all the pushing yourself a little further. Your body has to restructure itself to grow, and while that process should not cause excruciating pain, it will probably cause some discomfort.

Whether you're going from couch to 5k, training for your first half-marathon, or taking the plunge for your first marathon, stretching your limits is not comfortable. Stepping out of your comfort zone is how you grow. Revisiting that feeling, again and again, is how you excel.

If you're doing you first training for a specific distance, any plan that increases weekly mileage an average of 5% per week and mixes in different speed runs will work. Go fast once per week, go long once per week, and enjoy all of your runs.

Good luck.

Added from an @runtowin comment:

Some runner's magazines concentrate on local stories and are way better than the national ones anyway (New England Runner)

Medium run, up-tempo last 3 miles #twit2fit

Streak day 48, 6.73 miles in 1:00:11 (8:57 pace). I decided to do a little up-tempo work for the last 3 miles of my run today, in preparation for Johnny's 5k.  Nearly four miles into the run, I went for a target of 8:00-8:15 pace for the last three miles, after an easy pace of 9:30-10:00 the first 3.7 miles:

Distance Pace
1 Mi 9:32
1 Mi 9:36
1 Mi 9:54
0.72 Mi 9:48
1 Mi 8:18
1 Mi 8:00
1 Mi 7:49
0.01 Mi 4:00

That might as well have been a race.  Oh, and I decided to turn onto Blue Lick Rd because there was a sidewalk there.  Bad move.  The sidewalk ran alongside a fairly deep ditch, and then was cut off by a fence and that same ditch.  Instead, I had to find a little extra distance on a No Outlet street somewhere else to meet my distance goal:

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RunningAHEAD - Strings_n_88keys's log: View Workout.

Want to drastically improve your 5K time?

Original poster wanted to know if he could improve his 5K time by more than 2 minutes.  I wanted to bookmark it here so I could find it later.

RunningAHEAD - Topic: How realistic is this goal? For real..

The initial points:

  • Ramp up mileage to about 35 miles per week.
  • Run mid-week 6 x 800m intervals at current 5k pace with 400m recovery jogs.
  • Run a long run of at least 12 miles with a fast finish (last 2-4 miles).

His result after training was going from a time of 22:55 to 20:30 with about a month of training.